Fresh water and salt water fly fishing in New Zealand and Australia. Brought to you by Riverworks waders, wading boots, vests, jackets, fly rods and reels.

Posts tagged “Fly tying

Riverworks – Wading Jackets, help us out

With the end of 2011 drawing close its time to start looking ahead and revaluating the Riverworks product range for the 2012 – 2013 season.

The Tongariro wading jacket has served us well over the years. However, technology has changed and improved, new fabrics are available and styles and fashions are always evolving.  The Tongariro jacket is not dead! We are looking to create a new jacket to add to the range for the 2012 – 2013 season and we need your input!

While we fish as much as we can here at Riverworks and we use the gear we preach and sell, we aren’t everyone.  There’s nothing better than getting feedback and criticism from the people that are using our gear and making the purchasing decisions in the stores.

So here are a few questions to get the creative juices flowing in all your fish riddled brains:

What do you want in wading Jacket?

How can the Tongariro wading jacket be improved?

When do you wear a jacket, to stay warm? To stay dry? Both?

Do you wear a vest under or over your jacket? Or not at all when wearing a wading jacket?

What’s your style of fishing when wearing a wading jacket? Tongariro style? Rivermouth / rip? Back country? Multi day trips?

Do you see a market for a basic lightweight packable shell style jacket, tailored (short wading cut) for trout fishing?

How important is the length of a wading jacket? Should they be longer? Shorter?

What are the key features you look for in a wading jacket? Big pockets? Zingers? Fly patch? Water tight cuffs? Style?

What’s your colour preference? Does it really matter or influence your purchasing decision?

Is price an issue? Would you be prepared to spend more for a better jacket? Or is there a certain price point we should aim to hit?

Post a comment below with your suggestions, and hell, if you’re feeling artistic pinch the kids crayons and draw us a picture of your ideal jacket, email it through to me alex@evolveoutdoors.co.nz and if you don’t mind Ill even throw it up on the blog.

I might get in trouble giving the bosses stock away, but why don’t I run a little competition.  The 3 most creative designs sent in will receive a little something.  If it’s a really shit hot design I might even be able to persuade Rob to give away one of the new jackets to the winner……………..


Alex & Jack – The footage from the weekend

As promised, here is a bit of footage from our weekend.

Im pretty new to this whole video footage and editing thing, but it seems to have come together ok.  The fish aren’t huge, but it was a good day out in the bush.

Enjoy:


Alex Broad – S%!*s & Giggles

I wasn’t sure whether or not to post this video,

However after throwing it up on vimeo it was very quickly reblogged on a French fishing blog, and received over 150 hits in its first day and some very positive votes!

We were likened to Beavis and Butthead with all the giggling and praised with the down to earth style of fishing.

So here it is:

I have to add that after targeting wary brownies in clear water all season that this was a breath of fresh air, I haven’t had this much fun on a fly rod in a long time.  Perch are voracious feeders and will predate on just about anything, I tried to get them to eat a popper, they didn’t hesitate.  This has opened a new world of fly fishing up for me, popping for perch in “workups”.  Give it a hoon one day, you might be surprised just how much fun it is.


Alex Broad – Sunburn and Sea Sickness

Finally a break in the weather, a chance to get out wide for some saltwater action.

The forecast looked best for Sat arvo, so a few ph calls / txt messages and a plan was hatched.  The 4 of us hooned out to an offshore reef only to be greated with a very green looking sea, a large rolling swell and little to no wind.

A few drifts and several kahawai later, Andrew hooked into the first king for the season on the jig, not a big specimen, but was awesome to get on the board.

A few drifts and a few more kahawai later I was starting to feel pretty rough, As was Jacks mate Jeremy.  We decided a few more drifts and we would head back.  Well I lost the lunch I had just thrown down on the way out, and had set up a pretty good looking burley trail, when Jack hooked up.  We knew from the get go this fish was solid, I yelled statements of encouragement for Jack, something along the lines of “Rip its face off Jack!” and “Give him death boy!”.  Finally this king got a good solid run straight into the reef, busting Jack off.  We will be back!

Poor old Jeremy was looking pretty green by this stage, so we started heading back.  Half way there I spotted some birds working, and made Andrew investigate, I quickly set up a fly rod and gave it to Jeremy with the instructions of cast as far as you can, strip as fast as you can, don’t strike like a trout, just  pull the line to set the hook.  First cast, we watched the kahawai smash the fly, trout strike = no hook up, Jeremy knew instantly why it hadn’t worked, a couple more casts and after a solid strip strike he was hooked into a good kahawai.  It didn’t go quite as hard as they normally do, but Jeremy instantly forgot about the sea sickness.

A few more drifts and after plenty of refusals, these buggers were being fussy, we decided to pull the pin.  Now a new plan was hatched, one that involved Jacks BBQ and a few Beers.  Andrews BBQ skills and Jacks vast culinary expertise resulted in this:

A feed fit for 4 hungry fishermen, a great end to a really good start to what will hopefully be a summer filled with fishy goodness!


Alex Broad – Beer never tasted so good

Opening day 2011 was going to be a bit different this year.

Instead of my usual trip to the south island I decided to explore waters closer to home.  After talking to a few mates we had a posse together and a spot to check out.  We knew the river we had chosen held fish, but how many and what size was something we knew nothing about, further research revealed little insight.

Friday the 30th rolled around, the posse gathered at the supermarket, supplies obtained for 3 days, packs packed, and we were off.  5 hours later we arrived at our accommodation, blistered, bruised and to be honest absolutely buggered.

The extra kilos of amber gold we carried in was well worth the effort, something we rejoiced in upon our arrival.

We checked a few pools that evening, and found fish straight away, feeding hard and seemingly unaware of our presence.  Again we rejoiced with cold brews, the river held fish, and good numbers too!

A good feed put on the billy and off to bed in anticipation of what the next day might bring.

Up early and another epic meal was quickly prepared by our camp chef, Lucas.  Before long we were off, not far from our hut Lucas promptly hooked and landed the first fish of the season, unfortunately no grip and grin shot here as the fish seemed a little camera shy and released himself.

The next piece of decent holding water held 2 more fish, Aaron hooked and dropped one, Andrew hooked and landed his first fish of the season.

As the sun came up another fish was spotted feeding hard, Aaron was put on point and a good cast brought this fish up to his dry, the fish then went to town on us, he did eventually come to the net in a rather unorthodox manner, but we wont go there.

Lucas pulled another good fish out of a side braid,

And another from a nice pool,

By this time it was my turn, fish were spotted, I cast, fish spooked.  This went on for a while, with a couple of hooked and lost fish in the mix.  We almost swore that these fish had already been fished to, but the lack of human sign suggested otherwise, perhaps I just wasn’t on my “A” game, or the fish were just way to smart for me.

Mid arvo brought an interesting change in target species, while stalking quietly up a pool I heard Aarons rod drop, the bolt on his rifle being worked quickly, I looked up to see him racing across the river bed towards a small flat, he stopped, the rifle came up, BANG.  Pigs of various sizes and colours erupted from the bush edge.  The rifle was placed down and Aaron was racing around like a man possessed, finally a desperate dive had us in fits of laughter.  His cheeky grin appeared above the scrub with his prize in a tight grip, a wee black piglet.  The little bugger was trying desperately to free himself and Aarons fingers were quickly becoming worse for wear, so he was released for another day.

A short search in the bush and we found the first prize, a nice fat sow.  The picture shows just how happy he was with this one.  And before you ask, No it wasn’t the mum of the piglet, we saw mum running at full speed, she was much much larger!

Aaron and I caught up with Lucas and Andrew further upstream, a nice pool holding a few fish, Aaron and I spotted from the far bank, we called the cast, followed by the strike, Andrew quickly had the biggest fish of the day to the net.

The sun was setting, and we were a long way from the hut, so we bailed in double time, stopping to pick up our pork dinner.  Arriving back at the hut we were greeted by what looked like an entire tramping club.  You certainly get some funny looks carrying a pig and a fishing rod up to the hut.

Camp chef Lucas whipped up another culinary delight, quickly followed with some fine scotch.  Off to bed to try get to sleep before the snorers cranked up.  No luck there, we re payed the favor with some loud flatulence in the morning.

By this stage I was still skunked and getting rather upset about the issue, early morning Lucas and I went down stream to where we had spotted fish the first night, we had left these as a back up.  These fish were in another world, chasing each other round the pool and just generally ignoring our flies, eventually we managed to spook the lot.  It was here I cut my loses and decided I wasn’t going to get a fish this opening.

The walk out was much easier, our packs were substantially lighter and the rain that had just begun, kept us moving at a brisk pace.  After copping a heck of a lot of flack about “loosing my touch” and “Using all my mojo up on the Hutt river” we arrived at the bush edge.  One last ditch effort at a fish for opening.  I spotted a fish in close and set up.  He was moving around a lot and was hard to keep track of, he turned up at my feet, a short cast, a good take on the dry, some aggressive playing and a good net job by Aaron, I had a fish to the net finally.  I don’t think I’ve ever been so happy about catching a little fish.

Finally 4 wet, tired and sore anglers arrived at burger king, we smashed back a good feed and nailed it back to welly for the league.

An epic trip with good mates in NZ’s back country is something you can’t beat.  Already we have other trips planned for other areas of the forest park, and a very very different proposition for next years opening.  But you’ll have to wait till next year to see what that is.


Alex Broad – Pre Season Training

With opening day just a week away I decided I was in desperate need of some pre season training.  Its been a long winter with not a lot of fishing.

I had a bit of time to kill on Saturday so went for a drive down to my local, the Hutt river.  First fish spotted wouldn’t have a bar of anything, and he was only fish I found in the first run.  A pair of canoeists came down the river past me, so I decided my chances had just been blown in this stretch.

I re positioned upriver a bit to a favorite summer stretch.  I spotted an ok fish in the back of the pool, but decided to scope the rest of the pool out and come back to him.  2 more good looking fish were spotted on the opposite side at the head of the pool.  Battle plan hatched, and I was back down the bottom of the pool, hiding in flax bushes, timing casts with the wind so the fish wouldn’t see me casting.  A few good drifts, followed by a fly change had me hooked up to a scrappy 3.5lb jack.

After crossing through the run I snuck up to where I had seen the other fish.  The glare on the water stopped me from spotting the fish, so blind casting in the lie and slowly and methodically covering the water saw me hooked up to yet another jack, this fella was bang on 4lb.

Both Fish still a little skinny after spawning, but recovering well.  The hutt looks like it will be in very very good shape this coming season.  Fish are in good nick and the bug life looked really good.

Im off into the back country this weekend for some opening day action with other pro team members, Lucas and Andrew, no doubt this blog will be flooded with good reports of all of our opening day missions come Monday………….


Lucas Allen – The BB

I promised last week to share a pattern I recently created. “Dubbed” The BB it was planned with durability in mind and also a touch of subtle X factor appeal. Oh, and some hot UV orange! The tying list below can be tweaked to your liking.

Hook: Black Magic B12/B16

Tungsten Bead: Black (sized to suit)

Thread: Orange UV thread

Lead: 1.5 wraps 0.010 from mid hook to head (nothing near tail)

Tail: Black Fluoro Fibre

Rib: Gold ultra wire

Body: Fine Black dubbing

Thorax: 2/3 Black Seal 1/3 UV dub (roughly chopped and hand blended)

Legs: Tan Zebra Legs

I found a few things that improved the tying of this fly. Cut the fluorofibre on a harsh angle prior to tying in (this keeps the tail from being too blunt in appearance). The body dub needs to be fine and tight to make a slender back end. Dub the Seals fur blend using a dubbing rope (makes for a nice secure hairy finish) then brush it out once tied in. Seals fur is wonderful for trapping tiny air bubbles, giving sparkle and life to flies. Also the Orange UV hotspots should be even and close bound.

I noticed that using the dubbing rope method also allowed the Orange UV thread to show through more than single strand methods when viewed under black light. This will make your fly stand out from the crowd, especially on the Tongariro during the peak spawning runs.

Speaking of which, it seems all the crew are going to be in Turangi next weekend. I’ll have to put The BB through it’s paces. Here’s hoping for a good dose of rain this time next week, sounds like the river is somewhat reminiscent of distilled spirits currently.

Well I’d better get back to the vice. Glowies are low and the Caddis need attention, you know the drill.

PS. Alex, I’ve got the reservations at Turangi Pie Shop sorted.