Fresh water and salt water fly fishing in New Zealand and Australia. Brought to you by Riverworks waders, wading boots, vests, jackets, fly rods and reels.

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New Riverworks Site – Now Live!

The new Riverworks site is now live!!!

The new bigger and better web site contains both the Home Page and the Blogging on the same site. This new page is much smoother and easier to use.

There will no longer be any posts on the Lifestyle Blog so jump over and check it out.


Andrew Sturt – My best 5 fish this season

My season started off in good fashion but things certainly went quiet after Christmas for a few different reasons. However along with Alex, Lucas and Andrew Marshall a lot of time and money was focused on the saltwater side of things and we had some success in that department.

At the start of the season Joel and I headed up the line to spend a few days paddling around on Lake O to try and satisfy the winter trout fishing cravings and bend some rods. We put in a lot of hours and a lot of energy over the three days we fished and were rewarded by the fish gods with quite a few fish landed. The typical Lake O bows were full of life and extremely strong. On one of the afternoons we jumped on a mates boat and I was able to snag this beautiful fish who ran me through all his tricks before finally accepting his fate.

Although this fish wasn’t a particularly big one, or in fact two, they are fish I will remember for a long time. The day after I caught the bigger one above, we awoke to torrential rain. Our friends had arrived in the comfort of their warm dry truck and were out on the water as we woke up. We crawled out of tent and had breakfast and got ready in the rain. Soggy and tiered we rowed out up to the top of our drift. Or friends on the boat had had no luck so spirits were fairly low. First cast I hooked into a decent fish and as I turned around to brag I saw that Joel had also hooked up. The guys on the boat must have been spewing and so we had a great laugh as we played them. These fish were pretty special to me because I remember thinking at the time that even though I was cold, wet and tiered, there was no place I would rather be in the world. (photos looking back at each other)

Back at home a few weeks later I headed out with the old man for an afternoon fish after work. The weather was looking great and there had been a good rise in the river temperature so we were keen as mustard to get over the hill and see what we could find. Sure enough not long after we arrived the hatch commenced, as did the evening rise. I was trying to make sure Dad picked up the first fish as he hadn’t heard his reel zing in quite a while, so he was on point. Luck just wasn’t going his way that day with a couple of false hook ups and a couple of fussy feeders. We came up to a favorite pool and there was a fish feeding like a maniac up in the eye. Dad had to re-rig and insisted that I try for him. Murphies law being the way it is, first cast he slurped down my offering. Feeling somewhat guilty that I had stolen an easy fish that Dad would have had for sure, I put the hurt on him and lent back hard on the rod. I hadn’t seen any part of the fish at this stage apart from his nose so I was surprised he was so strong. None the less I kept dragging him up to the net and was dumfounded when I lifted him out of the water. Unfortunately the image doesn’t really do this fish justice as the flash bounced back off him. He was covered in the most beautiful red and brown markings and fat as a house across the back. If I had any idea of what sort of fish he was there’s no way I would have put that much weight on him with my little sz16 emerger and 4lb leader. Thankfully luck was on my side.

A week or two later we jumped on a plane and headed down south for our annual, high country opening pilgrimage. On the first day of our six day trip we headed out and chased a few browns around in the morning. Later that afternoon it was off to the rainbow spot to see what we could see. I had been fishing in a favorite spot for only about ten minutes when there was a heavy splash out in front of me just within casting distance. Although I couldn’t see the fish I just tossed out my fly as far as I could in the direction of the rise. A couple of aggressive twitches and jerks and the line came tight. Just as the browny from earlier I never saw this fish until it reached the net. This one however I knew was a solid fish, It made a few good runs but it just felt heavy. I was ecstatic to land what would be my heaviest trout for the season and a new personal best. For the rest of the trip I had a big grin on my face.

As Alex mentioned in his post, February this year we headed North to chase down Tuna, Sharks and Kingies on the fly. As it played out we spent much of our time trying to land Tuna. I emphasize the word LAND as these things are in a league of their own. Although they don’t look that imposing to the uninformed, these things are bullets. They are built of 100% muscle and are stream lined to be exceedingly fast through the water. After spending the trip hooking up and loosing fish due to broken leaders and poorly seated hooks I finally managed to land this guy at the end of the trip. I can honestly say I have never been so relieved to land a fish in all my life. I can’t wait for round two next year.


Alex Broad – My best 5 fish this season

It was a slow season for me this year trout wise; however the salt water side of things was not too bad at all.

Early in the season Jack and I did an overnight mission into the Tararua’s, the river was nice and clear and the fish were feeding.  We only managed to hook into a handful of fish, none of which was particularly large, however near the end of the day I managed to hook into this wee gem.  A true pocket rocket, I’ve never been worked so hard by such a small fish before.  Jack did a bang up job of snapping the pic for me too, great shot.

I have a mild affliction, I collect and use old school film cameras, there’s something about it for me, and sometimes you pick up a sweet piece of equipment for next to nothing that whips the pants of any digital camera.  I had picked up an old Olympus pocket camera and decided to head out for a fish and give it a test.  Threw some black and white film in it and took off for the river.  I was greeted by a mayfly hatch of epic proportions and free rising trout, which for a change took normal dry flies instead of some sort of size 20 emerger.  I quickly secured several fish in short succession, if I remember correctly 3 fish in 3 casts.  They were all small scrappers, but this photo I managed to snap really portrays what the evening was like for me, on my own, fading light and a few fat little trout to keep me company.

Cicada’s really get me going in the summer, there’s nothing better than seeing that brownies nose break the surface and swallow your big ugly foam and rubber concoctions.  This fish was another pulled from my local, the Hutt River.  He was lying pretty doggo on a lip in some rough water; I could barely make out a smudge that would sway to the side occasionally.  After a few casts he decided it was time to have a closer inspection, I hit him hard and he jumped and went ballistic for a bit then slogged it out slowly like most brownies tend to do.  A nice solid fish from very very public water on a brand new cicada pattern I was testing.  Can’t get much better.

In February we got a syndicate together and headed north for a week of salt water fly fishing out of Tauranga.  The first couple of days were spent trying to find Kingies, which just weren’t anywhere to be found, on the surface or down deep, but we kept ourselves amused with Kahawai.  By this stage we had basically figured out it was Kahawai or Skippies, as schools of Skippies kept busting up around us then disappearing.  We figured them out pretty quickly, but what took a little longer was figuring out how to control yourself and one of these wee barrels of muscle on a fly rod.  I was testing a new Riverworks concept rod and reel in a 9 weight, this performed flawlessly, but getting used to the sheer power these small fish had was something different.  Busted leaders and pulled hooks had us “green horns” getting pretty frustrated.  But we conquered a few, and it was some of the most fun I’ve ever had on a fly rod.

Before we left on our trip of the year I had laid down some requests, a Kingie on fly, a Tuna on fly and a Shark on fly, well I had ticked the Tuna box, the Kingie box just wasn’t going to get ticked, which left the Shark.  I had come prepared with knot able wire, some 9/0 hooks and some chum style tube flies.  We set up the heavy gear and proceeded to chum up with Kahawai and Skippys.  The idea was to get some Makos in close to the boat, throw a cast and hope they liked the look of the fly, then hold on.  The Makos never arrived but the Bronzies did.  After circling the boat for a while they built up confidence and smashed our chum hanging from a float.  Several casts were made, hoping the smaller fish would take the fly.  It’s not often you want the small one to take a fly.  Instead big brother mouthed the fly for a bit then took off with the 9/0 firmly imbedded, all I could do was hold on and take the inevitable spanking like a man.  After Mr Bronze Whaler had taken the shooting head, running line and a lot of backing the line went slack.  I was gutted but relieved at the same time, after all what the hell was I going to do with a very large pissed off shark at the side of the boat?  My “awesome knot able wire” had untied itself.  I was shaking like a haunted shit house, but amped to have been attached to such a large fish on a fly rod.  This is screen grab from the video footage we shot, me bending a 14wt rod and a shark of around 180kg doing his best to spool an ultra heavy duty salt water reel with the drag cranked up.  While no sharks were landed, this memory will be forever ingrained deeply in my mind.  Perhaps a moment of stupidity? Or perhaps just trying to push the boundaries?  I’ll be back to hit them up again that’s for sure.


Lucas Allen – The Deep End

A while back Hamilton Anglers Club held a trip in Taumaranui to fish the well regarded waters surrounding this region. I was fortunate enough to pick up a spot and jump in on the action. Matt, his partner Sophie and I bowled down the line after work on Friday and got into the camp dining room just as the others were about to start 2nds for the nights meal. The shit talking was already in abundance and somehow amongst this we arranged our beats for the following day.

Our sleeping quarters were on the better side of not too bad – pretty warm and no rocks in the mattresses. This ensured a well needed rest and sleep in until 7am. Porridge and fresh coffee were devoured and in short order we were on our way. The camp ground at Taumaranui is so close to the river we could hear it. A quick check to see if the rain over the last few days had affected it heralded smiles all round.

We headed South and straight to the beat that is fast becoming one of my new favourites. No cars in the car park and we were straight into it, in fact so quick I popped out of the bush and stared directly at a trout. I had the honours and thought my new R2 reel couldn’t be blessed better – I was wrong. Somehow in the slightly murky water it picked us up and slipped the cordon. All 3 of us fished  through the likely spots and started to question ourselves…

With the sun still low and at our backs we edged upwards. I left Sophie and her coach to explore the next pool. A decent brown feed in a bypass but the sun and positioning of myself made it impossible to fire one out to it. Hugging a tree I attempted a few lack lustre shots at it. No joy. Another fish metres up and the same result. Bugger this, I pushed on and tried a stretch with better angles.

Sure enough the tactic worked and soon after I had a fight on my hands. If you want a scrap these fish pack some serious grunt and will push you around like you were Beth Hekes bitch. Even the little tackers go like stink. I’ve since been advised the 8wt is a better option at times!We had more club members coming along and they headed up further. Sophie and Matt caught up and we tried another pool before we called lunch and turned back to the Truck. A quick drive and we had the best tailgate Ham and Cheese rolls in town at our new location. From here we walked to a spot that was recommended by a fellow member.

This resulted in a nice wee brown and another flighty ‘bow. One of those pools that has major holding promise and massive summer terrestrial potential. As Sophie was feeling rather ill by now – seems the flu was doing the rounds of a few others to – we decided to head closer to the camp grounds. We jumped back in the ride and floored it back to the Whanganui. This stretch gets a hammering but for some reason just keeps on keepin on.

As funny as it seems there were fish at each end of this rainbow. It was touching the bank on our side so this is where we started. Soon enough Sophie had a fish to the net then promptly had a much deserved sleep next to some (a lot of) sheep shit. I was just up river and at times we had double hook ups culminating in some unsavoury words yelled from Matt as he dropped “the brown of the trip”. He was having a rough day but was a stellar guide to Sophie.

That night we all regrouped and tallied our days efforts. I was pretty chuffed with my days total hooking 9 and landing 9, not every day you nail a 100% strike rate. 31 fish landed by 10 anglers, biggest brown was 3.3lb to Craig and a 4.25 lb rainbow went to Steve. There were a few stories of trophys lost so it’s good to know they’re about. We all piled into the Taumaranui RSA courtesy van and went to watch the first Ireland v ABs game. Talk about being on the set for Once Were Warriors x Boy movies, what a hard case bunch of local characters. Once back at the camp we set about solving the worlds fishing problems over some reds and a good blue.

The next morning dawned pretty much the same, foggy and threatening to drizzle. Perfect if you ask me. The rivers were still clearing and we decided to put Sophie onto some fish from where we finished up the night before.

The plan worked in no time and she nailed a few fish in quick succession. All nice rainbows in tiptop condition.

After scoring a handful more fish each we started the drive home. Matt had a lovely King Country stream to try that fed the Whanganui. We dropped in near a country sports ground and set to work. In the second pool a slight twitch had the indicator struck at and I was away.

Hot potato
This Jack was a feisty little bastard. It only took 3 attempts with the self timer while he splashed water all over the show, including the lens! Sophie “tag and released” a beauty brown and soon after we turned back to the truck to push up further. This section had the lovely setting of native bush blended with farmland. We made friends with the huge local Fantail population – at times 3 would be cheekily perched on your rod.

Matt spied a good fish gobbling away in the tea-stained water and crashed down the bank while we peered over the cliff to spot for him. After ironing out the drift it moved sideways to intercept. Then all hell broke lose as it found the closest log to hide under. It happened to be right by Matt and he tried in vain to stop it but to no avail. A flash of colour and it snapped free.That was to be it for the weekend. Bloody good fishing in some familiar water and exploring some virgin water – good times. There were no stand out flies although a Hot UV spot did help. Anything from a H & C, Pheasant Tail or small Olive Naturals were being picked up in the grubby water.

It has rained nicely over the last few days and coupled with the cold snap last week the Winter fishing around these ways should be sparking up even more so. A quick look at reports suggest the Tongariro was around 50 cumecs and highly fishable.

As I have a few things on over the next few weeks I’m going to sneak off for a fish this Friday. Here’s hoping for a cold, miserable dark night.

I’ve also been busy at the vice making flies and hope to post up a new Green Caddis that will be ripper for the Tongariro this Winter. Stay tuned, stay warm.

Lucas


Introducing “Frog Hair”

Riverworks is proud to announce the introduction of Frog Hair to our range of products. Frog Hair leader materials and accessories are at the forefront of technology and are undoubtedly the next generation in fish deception. Super tough materials, thinner diameters, and smarter accessories mean better results. We have been putting the gear through it’s paces in the field and everyone is very impressed with the results.

Frog Hair products will be on shelves in the next few months. We will be offering a large array of different tapered leaders, fluorocarbon, strike indicators and much more.

Frog Hair Tippet and Leader material is superior because our material is subjected to GAMMA’s propriety process. The process produces a material that offers exacting tolerances, super high tensile and knot strength and up to two times the suppleness and shock resistance compared to all other brands of tippets and leaders. For the angler, Frog Hair provides a more natural presentation with more hook-ups and a line that generates maximum fish fighting capabilities. Frog Hair Products are truly your new, competitive advantage.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Frog Hair FC is an ultra high molecular weight PVDF fluorocarbon made using GAMMA’s exclusive processing technology. Unlike other fluorocarbon monofilaments that are very rigid and stiff, Frog Hair FC is processed to increase the flexibility of the material and provide up to two times the suppleness of other typical fluorocarbon monofilaments. The added suppleness compliments the refractive qualities of fluorocarbon to deliver the most stealthy, drag-free presentation possible and increase your catch rate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

w/Perfection Loop –
Frog Hair FC High Performance Fluorocarbon tapered leaders have a stiffer butt section to optimize the energy transfer from the fly line and a supple tippet that offers superior knot strength, incredible toughness, and built-in shock resistance to deliver a more stealthy, drag-free presentation compared to other fluorocarbon tapered leaders.

The extra long taper section (over 60% of the leader length) is engineered to combine with the heavier, high density fluorocarbon and provide an optimal weight distribution along the length of the leader for exceptional roll out and a more powerful turnover.

 

 

 

 

 

Ultimate Indicators are designed for reuse after each application. Utilizing separate retainers, these indicators can be used time and time again. Attractive package contains 3 individual indicators, 1 high visibility orange and 2 in the two-tone configuration.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These are merely a few of the products on offer from the Frog Hair Range. To Check out the full range and find more details on sizes and weights available please check out the Frog Hair Website.


Lucas Allen – Curing an Ailment

A while back I devised a plan to convince Matt into a weekend of fishing in the Central North Island, that was the easy part. I was overdue a good concentrated dose of fly chucking so we schemed, planned, googled, schemed some more and had plans A to F sussed. What I didn’t plan for was contracting a cold in the lead up. Being a good Kiwi lad I told myself I could beat it, no way was it going to get in the way of a good trip.

We pulled into Taupo on Friday night and did the prerequisite shop – I still don’t know where the bread rolls ended up! We set up camp at the Old mans house and tweaked our final arrangements over some Pilseners. Seriously, how many times can one tie a new leader and fuss over gear? An early start had us on our way with a quick stop for a healthy  pie in Turangi. With that on board we carried on driving.The river of choice was looking very inviting from the road so we quickly set up for the walk over some farmland to access the lower reaches.Or so we thought…Having hunted around for an hour to find the supposed “there’s a way down but it’s a bit hard to find” track, we gave up and headed to another point we thought would be achievable. Hallelujah, it was just as Mr Google suggested, a little bit easier than the last spot. I was pretty happy about finally hitting the stoney riverbed.A quick scoff and assembly of our gear and we were ready for the fish of our dreams. This water was seriously lush. Soon we came to a great looking pool that had to hold something, something big and hungry. For a second I forgot I wasn’t feeling too flash. Not a touch, nothing to spot or even spook. We had planned for a low fish count so carried on.The water was super clear and cold, I found that out when I took a dunking while crossing a hairy piece of water above some rapids. Thankfully my foot found a hold and I managed to get back upright before going deeper into the pool. A word of note – if it’s dodgy buddy up, make sure your jacket is over your waders and closures are pulled tight. Wear a wading belt at all times, you can’t put it on in the rapids. If you get fully swept off your feet keep calm and drift feet first, bum down. You’ll eventually wash into calmer waters without snagging a foot on anything. Hopefully you’ll never have to put this into practice.

I wasn’t surprised when I dropped again. This time distracted by some noisy Whio. Damn, this was going to be a long slippery walk. And it was, this river was living up to its name. Devoid of any fish we pushed  upriver and had lunch. We reassessed and made the decision to high tail it out, fishing any hotspots along the way.

We blanked, oh well, it happens sometimes. It was an ambitious plan B after all. The scenery did make up for it though. A quick fish in a new river just before dark had the same result! We checked into the backpackers and dried out while my voice impersonated Barry White.

The next day dawned frosty and brisk. It was nice to eat porridge and gear up beside a still burning fire place. The next port of call was Matts pick. The scramble in was according to him “easier than yesterday”. Thankfully it was. Again we found some stunning water that cried out for trout. We’re going back early season. Take a look at what’s on offer below.Soon enough we made the call to exit and go find some fish. I had a beat that produced fish in the past so we began the drive home in order to stop there. Plan E.

Finally after all that walking and scenic imbibing I looked up river to see Matts rod being worked by a cranky brown. Oh yes, by this time I had lost my voice and only managed a little yelp of joy as I ran up river. Some quick net work had the fish in the bag.We partied right there on the riverbank.This opened the floodgates and we soon found rhythm. I spotted a good looking brown in the shallows feeding happily until my size 16 Hare and Copper variant glanced its lip. What came out of the water looked fair decent and in prime condition. After dropping the fish I discovered Matt had sabotaged me and left my net downstream. Upon my return he’d picked up a stunning Searunner.

Really cool Purple sheen to it and super bright, although a touch small.

We pushed up, pricking fish and landing a few others along the way. Even spotting a few more in the murky water. I was having a tough time making the fish stick to my flies and saw another brown thrash the surface as the hook pulled free. This was put down to my lack of voice, there was no way I could yell STRIKE! inside my head.After we made it to our designated limit we raced back down the track to the truck. With 2 hours of light left we knew there was a good section of the Whanganui on the way home that would finish the trip off in style.There certainly were fish in here and we had a blast taking Rainbows from their usual haunts. Any old fly seemed to be doing the trick but one in particular for Matt had him converted. The takes were hard and fast, even I managed to bank a lovely model for the camera.With that monkey off my back we called it a day. The drive home in the dark was a tease knowing that we were crossing bridge after bridge of fine water. There’s always next time.

This weekend I hope to charge the Waitahanui, an old favourite. Nothing beats Birthday fishing.

Lucas


Competition – Fish Of The Season “Winner”

The 2011/12 Fish of the Season winner is MIKE!

Congratulations to Mike , it was an extremely tight contest, with only three votes separating 1st and 2nd place but Mike’s Kingy was able to just tip it at the end. Well done Mike your prize will be in the mail soon.

Keep your eyes peeled because we will be running more contests on here in the near future, so there will be plenty more chances to win. Keep taking photos in your Riverworks gear and keep chasing those big fish.


Jack Kos – Bring the pain (3/4)

The day started well…

 

This solid rainbow took a well weighted colubriscus after several presentations. It was the first fish we saw. I was happy.

This happiness, however, was not to continue.

Andrew and I were planning on putting some serious leg work in and heading up up up. All was going well until we concluded that the gorge was impassable, so we’d have to take the alternate route around. Quite how it happened I’ll never know, but for some ungodly reason Andrew and I found ourselves on opposite sides of the river both following what we thought was ‘the track’. As it transpires my ‘track’ turned out to be nothing more than a blaze trail put in place to get to the pest traps. It was absurdly hard going. There was no defined path, just sporadic animal tracks that all of a sudden gave way to waist high falls through rotten logs. I pushed on for longer than I should have, assuming Andrew had to be ahead of me. Eventually, after managing to injure myself in some unprecedented ways, I beat a retreat. Back at camp I wrote a message in ash on our egg carton, and decided to try and salvage something from the day. After all, it couldn’t get worse, right?

I wasn’t sure quite what section of river Andrew might be fishing or whether he was ahead of me or behind me, so I decided to try and do a deep wade to get myself into a position to fish a bit of awkward to access water. The wade was particularly deep at one point, so I decided to shimmy my way across a couple of rocks. Then all of a sudden I hear an odd noise followed by a thud. I turned, just in time to see my Pelican waterproof camera case falling from my now split bag. The image of the case hitting a rock, splitting open and my Canon G11 sinking to the bottom of the river is seared in my memory. After retrieving the camera I simply sat on a rock in disbelief.

Eventually I gathered myself, crossed the river and started slowly making my way upstream. My heart wasn’t really in it, so I wasn’t hopeful when I spotted a smudge sitting a foot from the edge. I had to sit on a log to fish to this fish, so there was a little novelty to the attempt. My first cast was perfect. My second saw the wee beadhead pheasant tail rocket into the water about 6 inches to the right of the fishes face. He ate. The fight was uneventful, but the capture of my first brownie (and quite a solid one at that) of the trip raised my mood slightly. As for the pictures, well…you get the idea.

 

A little after this Andrew and I bumped into each other. He commiserated with me over the demise of my camera and we commenced our assault on the river in earnest.

 

It wasn’t until we came to a major bend in the river that created a large swirling pool that the action heated up. Andrew pulled a good fish from the head of the pool that had been rising consistently. It was a horrible drift because of the swirling currents, but eventually the fish ate his wee nymph. It then tore madly around the pool until he subdued it.

 

 

I figured that had to be the end of that pool after the antics of Andrew’s fish. However, a fish in the far side continued to rise. It was moving a long way to feed, so it felt like all I had to do was put the cast in the right place. I did, and it ignored it. It wasn’t until near the end of the drift when the fly started to skate along the surface that the fish tore backwards and engulfed it. I’d like to have hooked it this way, as the aggression was rather neat. Sadly the hook never set. Until the next cast when my nymph got eaten. Fool me once…

 

It wasn’t the best conditioned fish, but it had been a while between drinks.

 

We continued searching upstream to no avail. Deciding to hedge our bets and head upstream fast while there was still light we skipped a lot of water. But the gamble paid off. Arriving at a pool we’d seen several fish in the day prior it didn’t take long before we’d spotted on. The fish was cruising a slow beat and inspected Andrew’s fly very closely before refusing it. All of a sudden we realised there was a second fish about 3 metres behind. I can’t remember whether Andrew had to cast again or whether he simply continued the drift, but this time his tiny nymph was intercepted. This fish fought like a trooper. A large log bisected the pool and on numerous occasions I thought the fish had made it there. But Andrew fought it hard and there’s only so long a fish can resist such constant pressure. Eventually a great rainbow was brought to the net.

 

 

A little further upstream I got another chance and after getting the drift right I was connected to a silver bullet. It wasn’t quite the scrap that Andrew experienced, but a fit well conditioned rainbow will always give you a run for your money.

 

 

With darkness descending we headed back to camp to enjoy the now traditional steak, mash and peas topped off with gravy.

 

We caught some great fish that day, but unfortunately for me it was a tainted day. Taking all the possible precautions and still drowning my camera was a real slap in the face. Still, you can’t be too upset when you’ve still got 3 more days of fishing ahead of you.

 

Over to Andrew for the final wrap up…

 

 


A Different Interperetation Of “FLY” Fishing


Competition – Fish Of The Season (Final Update)

The Fish Of The Season Competition closes in just 10 days! Last chance to get your entries in and have a shot at winning the Riverworks voucher and bragging rights for 2011/12.

Make sure you get in quick!

 

A few more entries that are looking good.

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We want to see your best fish of the 2011/12 season!

The Fish Of The Season competition will be open for entries until the 30th of March with the winner receiving a $50 Riverworks voucher.

We will select our favorite five entries to post up at the end of the month and we will then let you guys choose the winner. The fish we are looking for are not necessarily the biggest fish from this season, but other factors such as condition, colour, surroundings and difficulty will be taken in to consideration.

To enter please send in a photo and no more than a few lines on how your fish was caught.

The selected five finalists will be announced Saturday the 30th of April.

Good Luck!

Entries must be submitted to: andrew@evolveoutdoors.co.nz

All entries will be considered and Riverworks New Zealand Terms and conditions apply. Entrants must have a New Zealand or Australian postal address and Riverworks New Zealand holds the right to make or overrule the final decision.


Why do you fly fish?

We want to know what makes you tick! Tell us why you fly fish.

Everyone who responds will go into the draw to win a Hunters Element Prime Winter Base Layer – This would be perfect for your winter fishing!


Mid Week Bloopers

Enjoy… 

http://www.wimp.com/fishingbloopers/

Just be thankful if you’re having a bad day fishing you’re not Bill Dance. “Oh shoot, dang”!


Alex Broad – Season drawing to an end

Thats right, the 2011/2012 fishing season is nearly over.

For most of us we either stop fishing and start tying flies for the next season, head to winter spawning rivers and lakes that remain open or battle it out in the lower reaches of our favourite rivers.  I had realised I had been concentrating of salt water fly fishing this summer and hadn’t done enough trout fishing, so decided I needed to cram a bit of fishing in before the season closed.

Last weekend had me down at the local (Hutt River), after hooking into a beaut jack of around 4.5lb I was very quickly in trouble, he had run into the rocks under me and I could feel my leader on the rocks.  Determined not to loose this fish I ventured into the river to try and pull him out, it got deeper, and deeper, and a bad decision had me in water up to my neck doggy paddling across a short deep part, while holding the rod above my head, still firmly attached to the trout.  I landed him, but was rather wet and dejected, managing to drown a camera in the process, unfortunately no pictures for this reason.

This weekend, I had some time to kill on Sat morn, so thought Id have a quick look around some of the water that is due to close around Wellington.

It wasn’t long before I had spotted a fish feeding away, however he managed to disappear into the murky depths before I got a cast.  A few pools further up I had another fish in my sights, swaying gently in the current and feeding well, I tied on a special fly that rarely fails me.  A couple of casts to get the drift right and he swung over, the white flash of his mouth was the only indication I needed, I stuck hard before my indicator had a chance to move, fish on!  After a rather slow but dogged fight I had a nice conditioned jack in the net.

A few more pools and another fish was spotted, same rig cast and this time I had the cast perfect first time.  The fish swung, the mouth opened, the indicator dipped and I struck.  I was met with brief but solid resistance before the fly came screaming past my face.  The fish obviously disappeared into the heavy water not to be seen again.  Unfortunately that was it for the morning, another 1 fish day, but 1 fish is better than no fish, and going fishing is better than not going fishing.

Only a couple of weeks left in the season, Ill be making the most of it.


Hamish Carnachan – Welly wilderness

Having arrived in Wellington to live after 30-odd years doing it tough in Auckland, I’m still blown away by the quality of the fishing in this region and how close it is to home.

Whereas my freshwater forays used to involve two hours drive across the vast Waikato dairy wasteland to find anywhere half decent to fish, now I have the Hutt River on my doorstep and the Tararuas and Rimutakas not to far beyond. Bliss!

I’ve been getting out exploring as much as family life  will allow, but a visit by a good mate  from Auckland – down  to sample some of Welly’s wares – provided a great excuse to bail into the bush for a night… or three… on a backcountry fishing expedition. The weather looked ok, not the blue sky days we were hoping for, but we pushed ahead despite the forecast patchy rain and winds.

Middle of nowhere

The first half day involved walking, walking and more walking in order for us to reach the hut before nightfall. We had to pass up some pretty stunning water but the prospect of a full day ahead soothed the itch to cast a fly. Despite waves of torrential rain and wind in the night, we awoke to  find the river running high but still incredibly clear. We packed up, rigged rods and set off. It was an hour, and plenty of barren water which looked ideal for holding, before we spotted the first fish crusing a large pool. As soon as the Stimulator landed on the surface the brown slowly glided over and took the fly at the most leisurely pace. Wait, wait – set. With the prick of the fly he woke up and it we were shortly on the board after a typically dogged brownie fight which gave me a chance to put the new Riverworks R2 reel to work… it past the test with flying colours, the drag silky smooth or, as one of my buddies would say, ‘As slik as snot’.

On the board

Riverworks R2 reel's first test

From herein the fishing improved with browns  spotted at regular intervals ll the way up to the next hut, depsite the slate grey skies and gusty wind making live a little dfficult.

Tim latched on to a beauty hump-backed jack that was one of the prettiest coloured fish either of us have ever seen – the pics don’t really do it justice…

Tim's backcountry beauty

The day warmed up, the wind dropped and the fish started looking up, hitting large terrestrials with explosive takes. And as often happens the further up a catchment you get, the fish started to get bigger too…

We topped the day off with eight fish to hand, a few spooked in tough conditions and a couple of blown opportunites – all in all not bad going in some pretty stunning surrounds.

Stunning water

A deer stalk along grasy flats that eveing revealed plenty of sign…

…and an unlucky stag a hunter had nailed some weeks before.

The next day we slogged it up over a saddle and down into another catchment where, instead of the comforts of a hut opted to camp beside the river where we thought our chances of running into a deer would be higher.

No deer but more fish…

…Followed by the long and weary walk….

I love Wellington!


Competition – Fish Of The Season (Update)

Hey guys we have decided to push the entry date of the competition back until the end of April now as there have been a few issues with end of season fish not being able to be entered until a bit later. That said there have been some great fish rolling in so please make sure you get your entry in, to be in with a chance to win yourself some Riverworks gear.

A few of the entries so far. Think you can do better?

————————————————————-

We want to see your best fish of the 2011/12 season!

The Fish Of The Season competition will be open for entries until the 30th of March with the winner receiving a $50 Riverworks voucher.

We will select our favorite five entries to post up at the end of the month and we will then let you guys choose the winner. The fish we are looking for are not necessarily the biggest fish from this season, but other factors such as condition, colour, surroundings and difficulty will be taken in to consideration.

To enter please send in a photo and no more than a few lines on how your fish was caught.

The selected five finalists will be announced Saturday the 30th of April.

Good Luck!

Entries must be submitted to: andrew@evolveoutdoors.co.nz

All entries will be considered and Riverworks New Zealand Terms and conditions apply. Entrants must have a New Zealand or Australian postal address and Riverworks New Zealand holds the right to make or overrule the final decision.


Andrew Sturt – The Wonders Of Duct Tape

During a private fly-in fishing excursion into the Alaskan wilderness, the chartered pilot and fishermen left a cooler with bait in the plane.

A bear smelled it and did this to the plane…

The Pilot used his radio and had another pilot bring him two new tires, three cases of duct tape, and  a supply of sheet plastic. He then patched the plane together, and FLEW IT HOME!


Video

Itu’s Bones


Competition – ‘Fish Of The Season’

Hey guys we have decided to push the entry date of the competition back until the end of April now as there have been a few issues with end of season fish not being able to be entered until a bit later. That said there have been some great fish rolling in so please make sure you get your entry in, to be in with a chance to win yourself some Riverworks gear.

A few of the entries so far. Think you can do better?

————————————————————-

We want to see your best fish of the 2011/12 season!

The Fish Of The Season competition will be open for entries until the 30th of March with the winner receiving a $50 Riverworks voucher.

We will select our favorite five entries to post up at the end of the month and we will then let you guys choose the winner. The fish we are looking for are not necessarily the biggest fish from this season, but other factors such as condition, colour, surroundings and difficulty will be taken in to consideration.

To enter please send in a photo and no more than a few lines on how your fish was caught.

The selected five finalists will be announced Saturday the 30th of April.

Good Luck!

Entries must be submitted to: andrew@evolveoutdoors.co.nz

All entries will be considered and Riverworks New Zealand Terms and conditions apply. Entrants must have a New Zealand or Australian postal address and Riverworks New Zealand holds the right to make or overrule the final decision.


Lucas Allen – Late Summer Missions

Hello again, sorry for the absence.

Well I figured after many quick after work fishing trips there must be something worth reporting on by now. To be honest, I’m still in a state of shock and am still found reminiscing about the good ol saltfly trip we did a few weeks back (click here incase you haven’t read it yet). It seems there’s another saltfly trip brewing but we won’t go there just yet…

My latest forays have been somewhat quick and almost rushed. With all the weather situations (bombs) that we are experiencing this summer the options to go trouting have been limited for me. Don’t get me wrong though, I’ve had my share and what lies beneath is a sum up for February.

The start of the month was frantic with family and weddings although I did sneak a trip into the Ngongotaha after hearing so many Cicadas I couldn’t control myself. What I found was a load of scrappy little rainbows that seemed to climb all over most offerings, except the Cicada pattern, go figure! There were a few heart stopping moments as they came up for a look only to then snap at the dropper.

There were a few decent browns basking in the calm waters and this one was kind enough to let me crane style cast a big Royal Wulff right onto its schnoz. It sat there for a long time just staring while I repeatedly told it to eat my fly. A change to a black wooly bugger saw it snap out in fury, the fly bouncing off its lips and frustrating the crap out of me.

After the Sister in laws wedding I ended up in Tauranga with the boys for our saltfly trip. It was bloody fantastic. I may have commented that trout fishing was dull in comparison, sorry I got a little carried away. Watching Alex pack himself and reassuring him enough to cast at some hungry sharks was priceless. There is video footage out there, it just needs voicing over to remove cuss words and girly squeals.

Back to the local waters I ventured to the Mangatutu one rainy (surprise) evening with a new found fisho. Matt and I had been promising each other a trip and finally we connected. There must have been some serious karma stacked up between us because we had a ball. Fish just seemed to throw themselves at us, all within plain sight of the truck. The rain and rising river had the trout feeding hard and it didn’t seem to matter what we did.

Which brings us to Tuesday just gone. I repaid the driving duties by taking us over to Rotorua and showed Matt a few spots that have done ok for me lately. Sure enough we saw good fish within a few minutes and did our best to disrupt them from their activities. They were super spooky and hard to hook, either bolting off to alert their mates or lying doggo with mouths firmly shut.

Finally on our way back to the car we managed a feisty little brown on the dry that had a death wish. The big’uns stayed deep in the pool and dispersed once the little fulla tore the place up. You’ll have to believe me Matt was holding a fish, it just pulled the ghosty real quick when the camera came out.Since then I’ve read a report stating there are massive browns cruising where we fished that night. Given the full moon pattern and still night we blanked but have dedicated a night very soon to go have another crack, can’t wait.

With all the weather halting some plans I have spent time at the bench and have a few flies to show for my troubles. Some reworked, some new ones and also restocking the classics. I’m certain to give them all a going over in the next few weeks.

That’s about it for now. While finishing this blog I saw a clip on Nightline with William Trubridge campaigning for the Hectors Dolphin, looks pretty interesting. Wonder how they’d go on the fly, just kidding.


Alex Broad – Wading Jacket follow up

Hi guys,

First of all thank you all for your help and suggestions for the new wading jacket.  We really appreciate our customers input.

It appears we definitely have 2 very separate camps here, 1 for the wading jacket similar to what is already on the market and 1 for the more compact, simple, packable shell.   All I have to do now is convince Rob to do 2 jackets so everyone has an option!

I received a few jacket designs, which were all really good and well thought out.  Here they are:

From Calum McKenzie, a keen young fisherman and outdoorsman:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From Lisa McKenzie:

From Daren Gamble:

Thanks very much guys for all the effort you put in.

Everyone’s ideas have been taken into consideration and will form a check list to help us design a wading jacket for our customers.  The design process for this jacket will be blogged continuously and at every stage our readers will be included in the discussions and decisions relating to this.  We want you guys to see and be involved in everything from the concept right through to production.

Thanks again and keep an eye out next month for the initial concept sketches, we will need your votes!


Jack Kos – Tomorrow the madness begins

Three and a half days of backcountry fishing, tents, smelling like ass and tinned food. Can’t wait!


Jack & Alex – Getting away from the city

Since Jack has been back in wellington we have had many discussions about fishing and overnight adventures in search of pristine north island water and brownies.  Due to our current lack of physical fitness we settled on an easy one to break ourselves in.

Friday afternoon came around and I received a txt message from Jack, it was a stunning day and he was ready to ditch his suit and tie and get into some fish.  I wasn’t far behind him.  The essentials were purchased (sun screen and hay fever tablets) the truck packed and we were off.

A dinner at Subway followed by Jack checking his exam results on my phone, Ill let him tell you how he got on, Ill just say it was good start to the weekend.  A few beers bought to celebrate at our campsite and into the bush we headed.  Talking smack about fishing killed the time and soon enough we were sleeping like babies, only to be rudely waken by the alarm.  Sausages for breaky, then into the fishing!

Jack always manages to get the best shots:

First decent pool held a couple of trout, Jack managed to pull a wee battler out with out too much trouble.

Next fish was mine, well I had trouble getting the right drift, but eventually hooked up, only for the fly to pull, this was entirely my fault, I didn’t strike nearly as hard as I like to.  The fish went back to feeding pretty quickly, but I just couldn’t get him to look an anything else.

We pushed on to fish to several very spooky fish who wouldn’t take anything, When I spotted a fish sitting on a seam high in the column.  I had changed my rig, swapped my indicator for a dry and ditched the nymph.  I pumped a cast up, little too wide and too far above him, second cast about a foot in front of him and slightly to one side, smashed it down as hard as I could, he swung and smashed it.  So I smashed him back and we had a wee tussle, a nice brownie landed.

A few more spooky fish were encountered, Jack not having much luck on these.  I spotted one feeding hard in a small deep pool / pocket, First cast ended up in the tree behind me, once I had that sorted my fly was flicked up.  Again the fish didn’t hesitate to wallop my dry, I hit him hard and he went ballistic, for a little fish he had me dancing on rocks and switching up the rod angles to keep him in the pool and away from obstacles.  We landed a nice fat brownie that had well and truly given me an epic run around.

Couple more spooky fish were spotted and Jack had a take fishing blind, but unfortunately it was the start of our long walk back to reality.  We did capture some great video footage, so as soon as I get it sorted I’ll post it up.  For now enjoy the pics and keep an eye out for the next adventure…………


Alex Broad – Sunburn and Sea Sickness

Finally a break in the weather, a chance to get out wide for some saltwater action.

The forecast looked best for Sat arvo, so a few ph calls / txt messages and a plan was hatched.  The 4 of us hooned out to an offshore reef only to be greated with a very green looking sea, a large rolling swell and little to no wind.

A few drifts and several kahawai later, Andrew hooked into the first king for the season on the jig, not a big specimen, but was awesome to get on the board.

A few drifts and a few more kahawai later I was starting to feel pretty rough, As was Jacks mate Jeremy.  We decided a few more drifts and we would head back.  Well I lost the lunch I had just thrown down on the way out, and had set up a pretty good looking burley trail, when Jack hooked up.  We knew from the get go this fish was solid, I yelled statements of encouragement for Jack, something along the lines of “Rip its face off Jack!” and “Give him death boy!”.  Finally this king got a good solid run straight into the reef, busting Jack off.  We will be back!

Poor old Jeremy was looking pretty green by this stage, so we started heading back.  Half way there I spotted some birds working, and made Andrew investigate, I quickly set up a fly rod and gave it to Jeremy with the instructions of cast as far as you can, strip as fast as you can, don’t strike like a trout, just  pull the line to set the hook.  First cast, we watched the kahawai smash the fly, trout strike = no hook up, Jeremy knew instantly why it hadn’t worked, a couple more casts and after a solid strip strike he was hooked into a good kahawai.  It didn’t go quite as hard as they normally do, but Jeremy instantly forgot about the sea sickness.

A few more drifts and after plenty of refusals, these buggers were being fussy, we decided to pull the pin.  Now a new plan was hatched, one that involved Jacks BBQ and a few Beers.  Andrews BBQ skills and Jacks vast culinary expertise resulted in this:

A feed fit for 4 hungry fishermen, a great end to a really good start to what will hopefully be a summer filled with fishy goodness!


Alex Broad – Quick Morning Fish

Andrew and I had a bit of time to kill before a hunt over in the Wairarapa.

So I took Andrew to a few spots for a bit of exploring and just generally checking out new water.  We only saw one fish, a very dark slightly slabby looking jack in very shallow water.  I set up and cast several flies over him for no real reaction.  I changed to a dirty fly, but that just seemed to put the fish down.  He swam out deep then around straight below us.  We waded down past him, he seemed not to care, chucked a few more flies at him for no reaction, then he decided to come and check me out.  He was within a rod length of me, I was drifting a large fly past his nose and bouncing it off the rocks in front of him, he would follow and try and bite the split shot in front of my fly on my leader!

Eventually he bit the sharp end and I had him on, quickly landed and released, but I have to say that this was the weirdest trout behavior I have ever seen, he even pretended to rise, bringing his head right out of the water without opening his mouth.  Weird fish.

Andrew and I continued on to our intended destination for a hunt, check out how Andrew’s first hunt went here: