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Andrew Hearne – The biggest, baddest nymph in the world!


I’ve just returned from a few days in the South. I had a pretty good time with a few of the boys away in the bush chasing fish. There will be more on that in the next couple of days or so… watch this space!

In the meantime I thought I had better keep my word and reveal the biggest, baddest nymph ever!

Remember this fish?

This is the fly which did the job.

And this one…

Likewise…

There it is. The big purple Stonefly. I saw them tied like this a few years ago in a magazine and I’ve been tying them like it ever since. I used to limit myself to the smaller sizes but in recent times I have become a big fan of the larger model.

God knows why they take it, it isn’t exactly natural. I’ve had takes from both Browns and Rainbows though, so there must be something in it.

The recipe for this wee piece of magic is;

Hook: Tiemco 200R

Thread: Black – whatever size you are comfortable with using.

Underbody: 0.35mm lead wire

Tail & legs: Purple goose biots

Abdomen & Thorax: Purple dubbing – abdomen is overlaid with clear flexi body

Wingcases: Black flexi body or thin skin

Antenna: rubber legs

I tie it pretty heavy. I start by binding the length of the hook shank with thread. Cut a strip of flexi body and angle off one end. Tie it in right at the back by the angled bit.

Then I tie in a length of lead wire along each side to widen the profile. I follow up by wrapping lead from one end of the shank to the other, covering the two pieces you’ve just tied down.

By the time you’ve done this it should be feeling pretty heavy.

The next thing to do is start dubbing the body. I use some purple stuff which is quite bright and sparkly – these flies require quite a lot and I’ve nearly run out…

When you get to about where you think the tail should be, stop dubbing and tie in a goose biot on either side of the shank. After that resume dubbing to about half way along the shank. That’s about where I start the thorax.

Now is the time to wrap the flexi body over the dubbing. Bring it forward and position it so the tail sits naturally. This can take a bit of practice, but you’ll get there.

Tie it off when you reach the end of the dubbing and trim what you don’t need.

I tie in a strip of black flexi body or thin skin with a V snipped out of it at the rear of the wingcase. Once this is in place, tie in the first 2 legs. Then you can tie another bit of the black stuff down and start dubbing the thorax. At about halfway, bring the black stuff over and tie it down. Tie in another couple of legs, and repeat the process for the front half of the thorax. After you’ve tied the front section down you can finish off by tying in the last 2 legs and a couple of rubber legs poking forward as antenna.

Whip finish it, and it should look pretty good.

It isn’t the easiest fly on earth to tie, but it can be done. I use these for when I need to get a nymph deeper than usual. It seems to work.

One response

  1. Peter W

    geez, sounds like there’s more metal in it than an Ozzy Osbourne concert.

    I wonder what makes the trout go for it, if the colour adds anything or if it’s just the shape it likes.

    Either way, if it works, why change it 😉

    February 10, 2012 at 10:48 pm

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