Fresh water and salt water fly fishing in New Zealand and Australia. Brought to you by Riverworks waders, wading boots, vests, jackets, fly rods and reels.

Andrew Hearne – Sometimes it rains.


This report is from a few weeks back.

Last November Jack and I bumped into Mike for the first time when we were on our trip. We were on our third day, walking into a river near Murchison. We had a chat with him for a bit, and he seemed like a decent bloke. Mike was on a mountain bike that day, and we were grateful when he offered to leave a lot of water to fish. He told us to let him know how we got on that day once we were back home, and we did. After a couple of emails back and forth he still seemed like a decent bloke, we agreed to meet up for a fish at some stage.

Fast forward a few months to mid April, after a few earthquakes and other false starts where either of us weren’t able to make it because of work or whatever other reason, we finally got to catch up for that fishing trip.

I finished work at 7am on the Thursday. I had about 3.5 hours sleep, quickly packed some gear into the car and headed to Nelson. After checking in with the family I went around to Mikes to catch up and find out what the plan was for the coming days.

The weather forecast was terrible, but we decided to go anyway. After all you won’t catch them sitting on the couch. (At least I don’t think you will)

The next morning was an early start. We packed up and were away, heading for what we hoped would be reasonable weather and clear water. An hour or so later the inflatable was loaded up and we were nearly there.

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That afternoon it rained steadily and  the river began to discolour as we fished the lower reaches. We found a few fish, which were unresponsive, before we met with an angler coming downstream who had already fished this section. After a brief chat we decided to head upstream for a while and look for fish which hadn’t been harrassed already that day.

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As luck would have it, we found some. There were at least three fish in the first run, but they weren’t going to come easy. After several fly changes I tricked one with a size 16 Coloboriscus nymph, which the fish took very slowly and deliberately. A good scrap followed and I landed a nice rainbow.

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It was great to get one on the board.

Mike hooked up on one in the same run shortly after, but unfortunately it snapped off. He had another take from a fish in the same run, but that didn’t stick either.

A couple of runs upstream Mike fished at another fish which took his soft hackle nymph delicately, but again didn’t connect. He was understandably frustrated. I persuaded him to tie on the dirty fly (Alex, you know this one) and try it on the fish, which was still there, although was no longer moving. To his surprise, it took the dirty fly. But adding to his frustration, it didn’t connect either.

Before we moved on, I wanted to try one last tactic. I hate leaving fish sitting there, so instead of throwing a rock at it I did the next best thing and tied on what can only be described as an abomination, which I bombed across the fish.

I’ve seen some special stuff with this fly, but this comes close to taking the cake. The fish turned and accelerated towards the abomination. The abomination got very close to the edge so I stopped stripping. The abomination just hung there in the slack water, and whack. The fish smashed it right at our feet. The pair of us looked at each other in disbelief, and I landed a nice looking brownie soon after.

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I never really expected to see that fish in my net, but it goes to show that you never really know. Anything is worth a try sometimes.

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It was time for us to disappear after that, the late season light was fading fast and we needed to get back to the hut for a feed.

The next morning we woke to a grey sky, and after a one square meal each for breakfast headed to where we’d stopped the previous evening. We arrived to clearer water than we had left, and saw a fish immediately to which Mike offered me first go.

I opted to cast from where I stood instead of crossing the cold river for fear of getting cold,  and the fish responded by chasing the fly halfway across the current and taking it. Unfortunately I only managed to hook up for a couple of seconds before the fish was free.

The next fish were feeding actively in slow moving water. I never looked like catching them.

It took a while to locate more fish after this, but we eventually came to a long run which Mike assured me usually held fish. By now it was raining hard, the water surface was very broken and much harder to see into than it had been. Looking carefully as we went, we found a fish feeding hard off the surface near the other side of the river. It looked like he was on emergers.

Mike crossed over, and the fish disappeared.

Just as Mike decided to come back over to my side I saw a nice looking fish just upstream from where I stood. I yelled out to him and he told me to have a go for it. I did as he requested and my line came up tight on the first cast.

The rain was too heavy for me to take the camera out, so we used Mikes waterproof one instead. It was so wet we couldn’t get the lens dry, so the picture isn’t as clear as usual.

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The fish was released and we returned upstream to near where it had been hooked.  We looked and saw the rising fish was back on the other side…

Mike didn’t bother to cross back over. Instead he offered it to me. I cast from where I stood, just like I did for the first fish of the morning. As soon as I got the cast in the right place the emerger – sipping rainbow charged across the river towards us in angry pursuit of my fly, and we were soon connected.

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This fish was all messed up inside it’s mouth. It looked like it had been fighting with other fish or something?

The day before we watched as two fish attacked each other and tumbled downstream locked together as they battled. It was impressive stuff to see.

We turned back soon after that because of the rapidly rising river. The plan was to go back to the run where we found fish late the previous day, because we knew it held fish and we wouldn’t have to cross the river in the event that it became too high.

Mike hooked a fish on a nymph, and lost it. Then he hooked another, this one he landed.

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There wasn’t much elation associated with this fish, it was more like relief.

After that it was a quick march back to the hut and back into the boat. We arrived at the truck just on dark and headed back to Nelson. It was great fishing with Mike, even if it rained for most of it. Next season we’ll try to do it again properly, and maybe even get some video footage. Fingers crossed for better weather!

Speaking of video, watch this space for the second of our video clips from the past season. I’ll post it in a few days time.

6 responses

  1. Maybe not? They take a while to get your head around, but it’s happy days after that!

    June 2, 2011 at 5:42 pm

  2. “Dirty Flies” and “Abominations” I just can’t get them to work, maybe Im not dirty enough?

    June 2, 2011 at 11:14 am

  3. Robert

    Good stuff Andrew, Cant wait for that video.

    Robert

    June 1, 2011 at 9:26 pm

  4. It was making him wild alright. Good thing it wasn’t me though, as I don’t take to losing fish quite so well.

    June 1, 2011 at 8:07 pm

    • I have video evidence of this…

      June 1, 2011 at 8:31 pm

  5. Nothing drives a man crazy like dropping fish for no good reason over and over and over again.. 😦

    June 1, 2011 at 7:28 pm

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